hand_blender_3.PNG
Screen Shot 2016-11-06 at 8.20.47 PM.png
Hololens.JPG
DSC_3877-1960x974.jpg
hand_blender_3.PNG

HELPINGHAND


Portable therapeutic AR application for amputees

SCROLL DOWN

HELPINGHAND


Portable therapeutic AR application for amputees

 

INSPIRATION

There are nearly 2 million people living with limb loss in the United States. Approximately 60 to 80% of such amputees experience phantom sensations in their amputated limb, and the majority of the sensations are painful (this pain is called "phantom limb pain" (PLP)). Pharmacotherapy, surgery, and traditional adjuvant therapy (e.g. physiotherapy, massage, and ultrasound) are also not consistently effective. There has been clinical research showing that mirror therapy -- a way of positioning mirrors so that it visually convinces the amputee that he/she still has the missing limb -- is effective for some patients. We believe that an AR system that enables myoelectric control of a virtual limb and provides a visual simulation of the affected limb will be an effective and useful tool in the arsenal of treatments for PLP and post-stroke rehabilitation.

 
Screen Shot 2016-11-06 at 8.20.47 PM.png

VIDEO


VIDEO


Hololens.JPG

objectives


 

Our HoloLens application uses myoelectric and positional data from wearable sensors to predict the amputee and stroke patient's intended muscle movements and efficiently practice mirror box therapy. We use this input to create an AR visualization of an arm or leg in the patient's real world. The ultimate experience gives amputees and stroke patients the illusion that they have "regained" their lost or paralyzed limb. This responsive visual feedback helps amputee and stroke patients rearrange their brain's connectivity to reduce PLP and regain motor function.

Through a series of prescribed virtual therapy modules, symptoms and longitudinal progress can be monitored remotely by clinical providers. Feedback can be provided to patients for better compliance and engagement in therapy. We also enabled the virtual limb to be able to impact patients' real world. For example, we can launch music from the virtual limb directly on a computer in the real world.

 

 

objectives


 

Our HoloLens application uses myoelectric and positional data from wearable sensors to predict the amputee and stroke patient's intended muscle movements and efficiently practice mirror box therapy. We use this input to create an AR visualization of an arm or leg in the patient's real world. The ultimate experience gives amputees and stroke patients the illusion that they have "regained" their lost or paralyzed limb. This responsive visual feedback helps amputee and stroke patients rearrange their brain's connectivity to reduce PLP and regain motor function.

Through a series of prescribed virtual therapy modules, symptoms and longitudinal progress can be monitored remotely by clinical providers. Feedback can be provided to patients for better compliance and engagement in therapy. We also enabled the virtual limb to be able to impact patients' real world. For example, we can launch music from the virtual limb directly on a computer in the real world.

 

 

In addition to visualization of the lost limb, we also want to enable the virtual arm to interact with the real world in useful applications. We believe this will be more convincing and effective for patients who are suffering PLP. Also, in the long run, perhaps the AR system will be able to transcend therapy and enhance day-to-day functionality of people who are missing limbs.

DSC_3877-1960x974.jpg

The Team


The Team


JULIEn BOUVIER

ENGINEER

 

MEHDI LEFOUILI

ENGINEER

 

LINDSAY LIN

LAWYER

 

JINGRU GUO

DESIGNER 

ALBERT KWON

PHYSICIAN